Summer Reading List – Week of May 30th

Summer Reading List – Week of May 30th

I have an extra day off this week, given that it’s Memorial Day weekend, and with the craziness of my brother’s graduation dying down (even though I miss the celebrations and all the family that was in town), I’m finally able to read read read! Now, granted, B and I did go canoeing on Black Creek in Mississippi yesterday, but I think that actually made me sore enough to want to stay on the sofa with a book all day.

Bread & Butter by Michelle Wildgen

I picked up this novel, about three brothers who operate two different restaurants in a small Pennsylvania town, because I am lucky enough to have its author be my mentor at the upcoming Tin House workshop this summer. I wanted to get to know her writing style to better understand her perspective on my work. Other than leaving me hungry, this novel is definitely touching on some great insider-knowledge about working in food service. From Leo’s point of view, the reader gets this: “He sometimes wondered if any of [the staff] were worth the trouble. That was one thing Harry would get a taste of: the enduring, Sisyphean struggle, on any given day, not to fire your entire staff,” (135). Having managed before, I totally loved this line and related to the feeling!

I saw myself in another sentence, which describes one of the kitchen employees in the restaurant: “Oh, Lionel…he was one of those tortured souls who stumbles through the world but fries a great eggplant,” (130). I mean! I felt like that could have been me, only replace “fries a great eggplant” with “makes a stellar cappuccino” or “never leaves the inside of the cannoli shell empty.”

Loving it so far, super-enthralled, hungry all the time. Hopefully will finish this week and get into her other novel, You’re Not You, this weekend.

You Came Back by Christopher Coake

I don’t remember how I stumbled upon Coake but the novel has similar themes to the one I’m working on, most notably the notion of finding a lost family member. I’m interested to see how another author deals with a potentially maudlin and sentimental topic while keeping the reader interested and having the feels.

The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen

I am definitely reading this for the parallels to my novel, and because Dessen is a well-known, well-respected YA author. I didn’t know much about the genre before I started writing it, so reading this novel will hopefully teach me something about how to create the right tone and story for a YA audience.

Also on my radar:

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler – I lucked out and happened to notice Friday that she was in town giving a reading at Octavia Books so I got to hear a bit of the book and am so looking forward to reading.

Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self by Danielle Evans – I don’t know how I’ve managed to go so long without reading her.

The Night Guest by Fiona McFarlane – The NYT review of her short story collection pointed out all the craft that I could potentially learn from this writer I’d never heard of. I’ll start with her novel then move onto the collection, The High Places.

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