Summer Reading List – Week of June 27

Summer Reading List – Week of June 27

From the Fifteenth District by Mavis Gallant

I recently read “The Bog Girl” by Karen Russell, and then followed up on it by reading her interview about the story with the New Yorker. I was in awe of how, in the story, she created setting without me even noticing it, she transported me to this weird, otherworldly place and she set up dynamics between the main character, Cillian, his family and the kids at school. In the follow-up interview, she talked about the story, “From the Fifteenth District,” which inspired her a bit, saying, “In [the story], the dead are haunted by the living. One ghost complains that her widower husband keeps calling her “an angel”—she hates this bogus, patronizing word.” This idea caused her to come up with the bog girl. I’m always trying to understand how to be inspired, so that I can continue to build a repository of fresh ideas.  Having a long list of ideas means that if I am ever bored with something (i.e. my thesis!!), I don’t have an excuse to stop writing. I can just go to my list and start something new. I’m also thankful/excited to find a writer I’ve never heard of!

A Window Opens by Elisabeth Egan

I am excited to read this novel, despite the fact that the plot seems like something we’ve all read before: a mom who works part-time must start working, juggling family issues, work and love. I actually love new, fresh takes on stories like these. Here’s a short description:

“In A Window Opens, Elisabeth Egan brings us Alice Pearse, a compulsively honest, longing-to-have-it-all, sandwich generation heroine for our social-media-obsessed, lean in (or opt out) age. Like her fictional forebears Kate Reddy and Bridget Jones, Alice plays many roles (which she never refers to as “wearing many hats” and wishes you wouldn’t, either). But when her husband makes a radical career change, Alice is ready to lean in–and she knows exactly how lucky she is to land a job at Scroll, a hip young start-up which promises to be the future of reading, with its chain of chic literary lounges and dedication to beloved classics. The Holy Grail of working mothers–an intellectually satisfying job and a happy personal life–seems suddenly within reach. Despite the disapproval of her best friend, who owns the local bookstore, Alice is proud of her new “balancing act” (which is more like a three-ring circus) until her dad gets sick, her marriage flounders, her babysitter gets fed up, her kids start to grow up, and her work takes an unexpected turn.”

I’m really trying to make sure that I read both literary and commercial fiction (I’d call this commercial…) in order to see what makes a book like this compelling. Usually, the answer to that question is THE WRITING, THE WRITING, THE WRITING! So, I’m reading it because I’m somewhat interested in the subject matter, and I’m interested in the commercial health and prospects of a well-written book. I’ve been very impressed by novels that I consider peer to this one – Liane Moriarty is an author that comes to mind – and I hope that A Window Opens is another novel, and Elisabeth Egan another author, to whom I can look up.

Tin House Novels-in-Progress

Finally, I am reading a stack of 25-page novel excerpts, while around the country, 11 other folks are being required to read my novel opening. I am so excited to be going to this workshop/residency, so excited to be in a class with Dana Spiotta and so excited to have Michelle Wildgen as a mentor. Did I say I’m excited????

Well, I’ve taken an almost two-month break from reading and critiquing workshop stories, and I’m a bit out of practice. But, I know the drill. Read read read. I will hopefully read them on the way to and from St. Louis and Chicago on a mash-up Barry’s birthday-Barry’s presenting at a conference-Chicago Cub’s game road trip! And I’m excited to see the final manifestation of all of these novels-in-progress, whether its two, ten or twenty years from now!

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