Why am I so interested in Daddy Love?

Why am I so interested in Daddy Love?

I picked up the Joyce Carol Oates’ novel, Daddy Love, when I was in the library last week.

(I have this compulsion. No matter how many ordered books I’m coming to pick up, I always scan the shelves to find something else to add.)

I have only ever read one other book by Oates, the novella Black Water, based on **a true story** which deals with the death of a young woman who had been having an affair with a powerful, married man. Daddy Love interested me because, like Black Water, the novel focuses on a deviant topic of interest to contemporary readers. The plot could be described as the inner lives of victims of kidnapping and sexual assault. The character, Daddy Love, abducts five-year-old Robbie from his mother’s care in a parking lot in Michigan and over the next six years, trains him to be an obedient son while also raping him. The novel is not quite as explicit as Ramsey Bolton’s attacks on Theon, i.e. Reek, in Game of Thrones, but still, it’s explicit enough to disturb even the most morbid of readers, i.e. me.

But, I read it because I write stories like these, about these deviants and their misbehaviors. One of the stories from my thesis collection, formerly titled “Photo Shoot,” and in the process of being revised/rewritten, follows a fourteen-year-old girl named Sophie who must move to a new town before starting her freshman year. She and her mother move to escape the nasty legacy left by her father, who seduced, photographed and sexually assaulted girls in Sophie’s class. The story will hopefully show Sophie picking up the mantel where her father left off, turning from a victim herself into one who unwittingly becomes a perpetrator.

By the end of Daddy Love, Robbie is out of Daddy Love’s grip but the reader is left with the sense that he still craves the type of relationship he had with his abductor. Robbie is much changed by the brutality of his captor. My hope, in my story, is that Sophie will be much changed by her father’s actions as well, to the point that I reader, despite their desire to feel sorry for her because of the pain she’s suffered, will also feel an inkling of fear, as the reader will know how dangerous she will become.

Oates, in Daddy Love, really tows the line between enough and excess in her descriptions of the torture and assault that Robbie undergoes. But the descriptions are necessary to ensure that the reader knows the extent to which he was abused. I am taking some lessons from this novel in the revision process of “Photo Shoot.” How much do I need to explicitly state what Sophie’s father is guilty of and how much can be inferred? How much does Sophie need to cross over into similar behavior in order for the reader to develop that sense of fear, that sense that Sophie is capable of similarly disturbing actions? How quiet can the story be while still instilling the feeling that something dangerous will happen?

Beyond picking up lessons for my own writing, I enjoyed Daddy Love for Oates’ play with time – she repeats the first few scenes of the story before the abduction takes place, as Dinah (Robbie’s mom) and Robbie are in the parking lot. This repetition reminds the reader that there is a moment – in this case, Dinah being slammed in the head with a hammer – after which there is no memory. The repetition creates the sense that Dinah is replaying, over and over, that which she can remember, because there is so much that she can’t.

Oates also plays with voice and point of view within sections, moving from one character’s POV to the other. Robbie and Daddy Love also have other identities, created out of their own psychological necessity, and Oates moves artfully between them. The characters themselves are also specific and richly drawn, but in very sparse prose. (The whole novel clocks in under 300 pages.)

One more lesson, though, that I took away from this novel, is the importance of an engrossing narrative and believable, interesting characters in a mystery. At its heart, this novel is a mystery, among other genres, because the reader is wanting desperately to know what is going to happen to Robbie. Will he completely forget himself, his parents, his previous life? Will Daddy Love kill him when he reaches puberty? Will he ever be normal again? But, the novel was so engrossing that I didn’t rush through simply to find out the end, to answer these questions. I really sat in the pages, sat with the language and with the story as it unfolded. It was too complex a tale to just be wrapped up neatly. (Although, it did end a bit too quickly for my taste…)

I’d totally recommend this novel, but not for the faint of heart!

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